Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Safe and Supportive Schools has administered the REMS TA Center to serve two critical functions to support a safe and supportive learning environment for children, faculty, staff, and others. We build the preparedness capacity (including prevention, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery efforts) of schools, school districts, and institutions of higher education (IHEs), and their community partners at the local, state, and Federal levels.

Visit

Federal Bureau of Investigations

The Federal Bureau of Investigation was tasked with gathering Practical advice from experienced school resource officers on how law enforcement, schools, and districts can work together to keep schools safe.

Visit

Higher Education Case Study

The purpose of this case study is to highlight the laws established by the Clery Act and recommendations for meeting safety measures to enhance campus security for institutions of higher education.

Visit

Campus Security Guidelines

Maps and Other Electronic Capabilities Knowledge of Maps and Other Systems 

31) Local and campus law enforcement should communicate with each other about available resources, including digital maps or cameras with video access to certain areas on campus Having up-to-date resources is important, but if the resources are not shared with other law enforcement agencies prior to incidents, the benefit will be lost. At minimum, local and campus law enforcement should inform each other via the PD Campus Liaison Officer when new technologies are purchased or significant changes are made to existing resources. This will eliminate the need to scramble during a critical incident when the local law enforcement realizes the campus map is outdated. 

Paper Maps of Campus 

32) Current paper maps of the campus should be available to the local law enforcement patrol units, especially those working in districts surrounding campuses Up-to-date paper maps should be available to all officers working around a campus. If an officer cannot quickly locate a paper map, a replacement should be provided immediately. It should be the responsibility of the PD Campus Liaison Officer to issue updated maps if changes are made to campus. 

Electronic Maps of Campus 

33) Local and campus law enforcement should have maps of university campuses on their CAD systems with identification of building names In the age of technology, law enforcement should expect to have the best technology. Therefore an officer should never have to question where a university building is located because that information would be available electronically. Ideally, every officer in a city vehicle will have information about the campus and particular information about campus buildings on the CAD system. In addition to the location of buildings, 28 Campus Security Guidelines Prevention and Preparedness there should be specific information about the buildings. For example, if an officer is responding to a call for help at a building, it would be helpful to know if that building has a lab located inside. 

Building Diagrams and Blueprints 

34) Building diagrams should be available to local law enforcement including details about the buildings (location of labs, etc.) It would be ideal for building diagrams to be available electronically. However if that is not possible, paper diagrams of buildings must be available to both campus and city officers. These diagrams must be stored somewhere accessible so when they are needed they are not locked in an office, but can be quickly brought to a command center. 

Diagrams of Tunnel Systems

35) Campuses with tunnels should provide diagrams of the system to local law enforcement Tunnel systems are not always well known to the public, but are a source for potential threats. Local law enforcement should keep track of tunnel systems in the city, including those located on campus. Diagrams of tunnel systems should be quickly accessible to all law enforcement agencies. 

Interactive Mapping Software

36) Local law enforcement should be aware if a campus has acquired an interactive software system Many schools, including colleges and universities, have purchased high quality software systems, which assist law enforcement with detailed maps and building information during a critical incident. Local law enforcement should survey campuses to find out if any of these advanced software systems have been purchased and find out whether the system will be compatible with city equipment. It is also important for city officers to be properly trained on the system if there is a chance they will have to use it.” (pg. 27-28)

Visit

Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting

This handbook reflects the Department’s interpretations and guidance, as of the date of publication, and was written to assist you, in a step-by-step and readable manner, in understanding and meeting the various HEA requirements. It is intended for use by the Department’s program reviewers who are responsible for evaluating an institution’s compliance with the requirements as well as postsecondary institutions and outside reviewers.

Visit

Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Institutions of Higher Education

As the team that developed this guide began its work to respond to the president’s call for model emergency management plans for IHEs, it became clear that there is a need to help ensure that college and university emergency planning efforts are aligned with the emergency planning practices at the national, state, and local levels. Recent developments have put a new emphasis on the process for developing higher ed EOPs.

Visit

Enhancing School Safety Using a Threat Assessment Model

As the team that developed this guide began its work to respond to the president’s call for model emergency management plans for IHEs, it became clear that there is a need to help ensure that college and university emergency planning efforts are aligned with the emergency planning practices at the national, state, and local levels. Recent developments have put a new emphasis on the process for developing higher ed EOPs.

Visit

Campus Safety Magazine

Campus Safety (CS) magazine and CampusSafetyMagazine.com exclusively serve campus police chiefs, security directors, IT personnel, emergency managers and executive administrators involved in the public safety and security of major hospitals, schools and universities in the United States. The print version is issued eight times per year and is distributed to more than 18,000 campus safety and security professionals nationwide. Online, CampusSafetyMagazine.com attracts over 94,000 unique visitors each month, and is growing rapidly to serve the needs of the expanding campus safety market.

Visit

Newsletter

Keep up to date on the latest public safety news

Newsletter